Wedding Manual for the Groom

Hermann Hesse once wrote, “All men are prepared to accomplish the incredible, if their ideals are threatened.” Threats aside, can the same be said for planning a wedding? We think so.

Photo: Quirk Books

From the author of Stuff Every Husband Should Know, comes Stuff Every Groom Should Know ($9.95 plus tax/hardcover or $7.96 on Kindle; via Quirk Books).

In this whimsical, marital must-read by Eric San Juan, guys get helpful tips for planning the perfect fête like setting a budget, creating the guest list and making a seating chart—plus, hook expert advice for navigating the choppy sea to Spousehood. (Sounds like everyone is getting an early Christmas present, doesn’t it?)

Below, four of San Juan’s wedding “musts” for the future husband-to-be.


VOW-WRITING: HALLMARK 101

Photo by Leigh Miller Photography

Photo: Leigh Miller Photography

Express yourself. If you’re going to do custom vows, make them count. Something as simple as a list of everything you love about your bride-to-be can be truly meaningful.

If you hear a fantastic line at another wedding, in a movie or a song, take it! Just don’t get too obvious with your references, else you’ll risk sounding tacky (and skip the “you had me at hello” kind of stuff).


SUITING UP

Photo from Elite Daily

Photo: Elite Daily

Keep your fiancé in the loop. Whether she has a vision for your outfit, or has no opinions on your getup, she’ll appreciate your thoughtfulness. If she knows exactly what she wants you to wear, just let her pick it.


RELIGIOUS OR NOT, HERE WE COME!

Photo by KT Merry

Photo: KT Merry

The decision to recognize religious traditions belongs to you and your bride alone. However, for the sake of peace and unity, it’s wise to allow immediate family to have some say.

If you are nonreligious, consider including a nod to their wishes in the ceremony—maybe a short blblical reading or a piece of religious music. You’re not betraying yourself by allowing a small gesture that will make family happy.


BE HER HERO

Photo by David McClelland

Photo: David McClelland

If a problem is distracting your bride from enjoying the moment, delegate damage control to someone else (such as your best man) and remove yourselves from the situation. Pose for a picture, get down to the Chicken Dance or sneak outside for a quiet moment together.


Favorite Chapter: “10 Things That Are Definitely Going To Change After Marriage.” Thought we’d tell you what they were? Forgettaboutit.

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